Growing up, one of my favorite shows was Batman –  the show featuring Bruce Wayne as Batman with all of the “boom” and “pow” effects. If it was on television, my brother and I and our friend Robin were watching it. We would even find ourselves acting out the scenes.

Recently I was doing some training for a leadership game, and the moderator asked a question about superheroes. We had to tell what superhero reminded us of our training organization. I immediately thought of Batman and some things that apply to life and leadership.

Here are my Five Thursday Thoughts on how Batman can apply to our lives.

Multiple Tools

Batman was not a one-trick pony. Some superheroes have a single superpower, but Batman had gadgets. The Batrope, the Batmobile, Bat Helicopter, and tool belt just to start. He had a Batarang and a Bat Claw and so much more. He had a resource for every situation.

We cannot know everything, nor can we be good at everything, but it does help us to be more well-rounded to deal with different situations that arise in our lives. I know people who know how to use a hammer well, but it can do more harm than good when used in delicate situations. You need other tools to deal with different situations. Learn new skills and hone old ones. You never know when you will need your Batsense to solve a problem.

Transformation

Batman was millionaire Bruce Wayne in his daily life. He went about his business as an average person on most days. But when needed, he transformed quickly into Batman, usually sliding down the Batpole into the Batcave. Multiple people benefitted from Bruce Wayne’s transformation. 

Life requires transformation. We are not who we used to be. We have either improved or declined. Rarely is transformation as simple as moving from one room to another; it is usually a journey that takes time. People benefit when we transform and live out the purpose God created us to live.

He Could Relate

Bruce Wayne was a regular person. He was wealthy, but he lived an everyday life like everyone else. He could relate to the fear and concerns everyone else had. His superpower did not cause him to look down on others. Even when in full superhero mode, he could connect with those in trouble because, in reality, he was one of them.

You probably have some area where you are a superhero. We are all a “10” at something. But we cannot allow our gifting or talent to keep us from relating to others. The most remarkable people can relate to others even in their greatness. We are all just people. Don’t think more highly of yourself than you should.

He Didn’t Run Solo

Batman had Robin as his sidekick. He shared his wisdom and insight with a much younger protege. He had patience with him even when he made mistakes. It was clear they were better together.

We are not created to do life alone. We need others to make us better, and we need to be a positive influence on others. Sometimes others slow us down or cause us to deal with things we would have typically avoided. But those people are usually better off because we are around, and we have others that make us better because they are present. 

He Respected Order

The Batman I watched was not a rogue operator. Though he was a superhero and had gifts that saved many people, he still reported to Commissioner Gordon because order is necessary. Lack of order creates chaos.

One of the dangers we have in talent is believing we do not have to answer to others. There is still order in the world. Even if we have more ability or insight than our superiors, we must show respect and honor. Your ability does not eliminate the need for humility.

I am not sure who your superhero was growing up. Batman was mine. Even today, writing this, I have thought about some things I can learn from Batman 40 years later. 

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